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View Full Version : Review: TulAmmo .45auto .380auto



Punisher11
02-09-2012, 08:14 AM
http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd296/dcb1265/9-08/1911Manual3022.jpg

This russian made full metal jacket, steel cased ammo can be found online and in most wal marts for decent prices. Ive had very good luck (in the thought that it fired every time) with the pistol caliber ammo. I havent had time to test out the rifle, though interwebs say it should perform like wolf, as they were former producers of it.

I tested the 45acp in my kimber during an action shooting match in December. While I didnt score so high (I was still used to me lower recoil reloads), I did complete every stage without a hiccup and got some decent Alpha hits. Close range shots grouped a little wider than normal, and shooting at max distance was challenging.

after the match the gun was noticeably dirty, but was still able to function normally.

The 380 was tested on my beretta 84 at a 6x6 steel square, from about 20~ feet, dinged it every time.

mind you, there is a notion that steel will wear out parts, such as the extractor or ejector (there is a difference) faster than brass. I havent committed to a long term test but there is a writer/shooter that i follow who will shoot this ammo exclusively this year. I will circle back and post his results and his opinion as it comes in.

Overall assessment: this ammo is great range use, practice and even stock pile ammo. Not only that but for the entry level competition shooter, this makes a great economical method to get in the game. The only drawback is the cases are not reloadable (unless you are desperate) and you'll have to scrub a little harder after

ISPKI
02-16-2012, 01:43 AM
While steel cases will theoretically wear out your internals faster than brass, keep in mind that the steel used in these cases is generally of very low quality and hardness, while many firearms are made from either 4140 steel (chrome molly) or chrome molly with a high vanadium content (increasing their hardness). 4140 steel is extremely hard, and well made firearm parts go through multiple hardening processes that usually bring that 4140 steel up into the 90+ range on the Rockwell hardness scale, which is harder than aircraft bearings. The steel used in these cases probably is not even hardened and likely has a hardness rating of less than half that of the 4140 used in most guns. To recap, yes the steel case will wear your gun faster than brass, but, if the gun is well made and properly hardened, you wont be noticing that wear until you put many hundreds of thousands of rounds through the gun.

ISPKI
02-16-2012, 01:47 AM
Something else to keep in mind with these cases, is that they are not bear steel, they are lacquer coated. lacquer coating is no longer used because it tends to adhere itself to the inside of hot receivers like super glue - especially when firing quickly with a semi auto rifle. This actually happened to my friend's ar15 a couple weeks ago and it is a real bitch to get the case out.

Punisher11
02-16-2012, 08:57 AM
Something else to keep in mind with these cases, is that they are not bear steel, they are lacquer coated. lacquer coating is no longer used because it tends to adhere itself to the inside of hot receivers like super glue - especially when firing quickly with a semi auto rifle. This actually happened to my friend's ar15 a couple weeks ago and it is a real bitch to get the case out.

i know what you are talking about, but these arent coated :) even the rifle ammo (223), i havent checked the 762 yet

ISPKI
02-17-2012, 01:19 AM
How do you know it doesnt have a lacquer wash on it? My friend and I shoot that exact same ammo constantly, and it is all lacquered and it all has that same dull grey color as the stuff in the picture.

Punisher11
02-20-2012, 10:33 AM
How do you know it doesnt have a lacquer wash on it? My friend and I shoot that exact same ammo constantly, and it is all lacquered and it all has that same dull grey color as the stuff in the picture.

its not lacquer, its a polymer coating. thats why its dusty. lacquer has a shine to it, i still have some old wolf that im not gonna use (unless i buy a bolt action) for reference

Punisher11
02-20-2012, 10:35 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_Ammunition


Lacquer coatingWolf no longer manufactures ammunition with a lacquer coating on the cartridge casing due to issues concerning lacquer-coated steel cartridges becoming stuck in the chamber of a firearm after firing, with difficulty in ejecting the spent cartridge afterwards. This appears to be more of a problem with cartridges with narrowly tapering walls (e.g. .223 Remington) than those with rather steep case walls such as 7.62x39 mm cartridges or pistol ammunition. This also does not seem to pose much of a problem for Soviet or East Bloc designed weapons that tend to have looser chamber clearances than Western designed weapons.

Tests have shown that steel-cased Wolf cases do not obturate sufficiently to form a good gas seal against the chamber [2] when compared to brass-cased ammunition. As a result, when Wolf cartridges are fired, some of the combustion by-products are deposited between the case and the chamber, causing a build up of carbon that is well in excess of normal. Firing a brass case (that does expand fully) after using Wolf ammunition can result in the brass case being "glued" into the chamber by the carbon buildup. This issue has nothing to do with the lacquer coating vaporising or melting, as has mistakenly been suggested. The problem is one of carbon deposition, which creates the same end result (i.e.; a stuck cartridge that has jammed in the chamber). It is important to emphasise that Wolf ammunition is perfectly safe to use because it conforms to all SAAMI standards. However, it is recommended that firearms are thoroughly cleaned after using Wolf ammunition due to the increased rate of carbon build-up within the chamber. As mentioned in the previous paragraph, the looser chamber dimensions of Soviet designed weapons allow for more room during firing and extraction. Soviet or East Bloc weapons do not experience these problems.

Note: all ammunition currently manufactured by Wolf has polymer-coated or brass cartridge cases and any obturation problems have been radically reduced.

ISPKI
03-04-2012, 01:20 AM
I have another update for you Pun. My buddy and I went out to the range last weekend with some boxes of tula 380 45 and 5.56. The walther ppks (in 380) jammed several times with the tula ammo. The simeron 45 did not jam, and his AR15 jammed closed twice within 40 rounds of this shit. The real problem is when the AR15 jams, it is extremely difficult to get the shell out of the barrel especially because the bolt sticks closed. The only way we could get it out was to hammer an aluminum cleaning rod down the barrel.

Punisher11
03-04-2012, 10:23 AM
I'm using the 45 auto next week for competition, shot the 380 the other week 30 rounds, no failures. Haven't shot the 223 yet. I know the ammo is more dirty than most, so I'm wondering how clean the ar was, like gas tube, chamber etc. Guy I shoot with uses it on his piston upper, says no ammo problems, though he had an issue with the bolt not locking up when empty (probably mag issue)

Punisher11
03-29-2012, 09:43 AM
Running some 380 in a little while, with video report

Punisher11
03-30-2012, 07:28 AM
50 rounds, no failures

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcRj7HLAceA&hd=1

Punisher11
03-30-2012, 07:31 AM
ps sparks were from the shots hitting the floor, the target hanger was lower than i remembered

Cyrax
03-31-2012, 05:52 PM
I shoot Wolf/Tula in my Ak and don't have any problems.


http://s16.postimage.org/apsmaicb5/tum.png (http://postimage.org/)

Punisher11
04-30-2012, 12:23 PM
I have another update for you Pun. My buddy and I went out to the range last weekend with some boxes of tula 380 45 and 5.56. The walther ppks (in 380) jammed several times with the tula ammo. The simeron 45 did not jam, and his AR15 jammed closed twice within 40 rounds of this shit. The real problem is when the AR15 jams, it is extremely difficult to get the shell out of the barrel especially because the bolt sticks closed. The only way we could get it out was to hammer an aluminum cleaning rod down the barrel.

check this out.

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu18.htm

it seems the steel case doesnt expand enough to create a super tight seal and allows excessive carbon build up in the chamber. if after running numerous rounds of the tula ammo, you decided to run brass, the case will jam, but not due to polymer residue. the carbon build up will get the softer, more expanding brass to stick.


also, im not busting your balls on bring this up. just its cheap ammo, and if people shoot more, its a plus in my book