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  1. #1

    Employee outsources his own job

    Bahahaha. First off, I have to applaud the ingenuity of this guy. Obviously there are security issues among other things with the idea but none the less, it's brillant. I love some of the comments too by SD "So employee does it, it's wrong. Employer does it, it's smart/acceptable."

    http://it.slashdot.org/story/13/01/1...ays-websurfing

    "The security blog of Verizon has the story of an investigation into unauthorized VPN access from China which led to unexpected findings. Investigators found invoices from a Chinese contractor who had actually done the work of the employee, who spent the day watching cat videos and visiting eBay and Facebook. The man had Fedexed his RSA token to the contractor and paid only about 1/5th of his income for the contracting service. Because he provided clean code on time, he was noted in his performance reviews to be the best programmer in the building. According to the article, the man had similar scams running with other companies."

  2. #2
    Intel & VTEC Inside EXCellR8's Avatar
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    '95 Civic Sedan + '08 Fit Sport

  3. #3
    lol

    link to actual article

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/01...ces_job_china/


    Security audit finds dev OUTSOURCED his JOB to China to goof off at work

    Cunning scheme netted him 'best in company' awards
    By Iain Thomson in San Francisco • Get more from this author

    Posted in Business, 16th January 2013 01:29 GMT
    A security audit of a US critical infrastructure company last year revealed that its star developer had outsourced his own job to a Chinese subcontractor and was spending all his work time playing around on the internet.

    The firm's telecommunications supplier Verizon was called in after the company set up a basic VPN system with two-factor authentication so staff could work at home. The VPN traffic logs showed a regular series of logins to the company's main server from Shenyang, China, using the credentials of the firm's top programmer, "Bob".

    "The company's IT personnel were sure that the issue had to do with some kind of zero day malware that was able to initiate VPN connections from Bob's desktop workstation via external proxy and then route that VPN traffic to China, only to be routed back to their concentrator," said Verizon. "Yes, it is a bit of a convoluted theory, and like most convoluted theories, an incorrect one."

    After getting permission to study Bob's computer habits, Verizon investigators found that he had hired a software consultancy in Shenyang to do his programming work for him, and had FedExed them his two-factor authentication token so they could log into his account. He was paying them a fifth of his six-figure salary to do the work and spent the rest of his time on other activities.

    The analysis of his workstation found hundreds of PDF invoices from the Chinese contractors and determined that Bob's typical work day consisted of:

    9:00 a.m. – Arrive and surf Reddit for a couple of hours. Watch cat videos

    11:30 a.m. – Take lunch

    1:00 p.m. – Ebay time

    2:00-ish p.m – Facebook updates, LinkedIn

    4:30 p.m. – End-of-day update e-mail to management

    5:00 p.m. – Go home

    The scheme worked very well for Bob. In his performance assessments by the firm's human resources department, he was the firm's top coder for many quarters and was considered expert in C, C++, Perl, Java, Ruby, PHP, and Python.

    Further investigation found that the enterprising Bob had actually taken jobs with other firms and had outsourced that work too, netting him hundreds of thousands of dollars in profit as well as lots of time to hang around on internet messaging boards and checking out the latest Detective Mittens video.

    Bob is no longer employed by the firm. ®

  4. #4
    Shit is amazing. Two sides to this coin though which is again, why is it OK for a company to do this and not the person doing the work? It also shows that well then why shouldn't the company do it in the first place since Americans will outsource their own job. Could argue this 100 different ways. Either way it's fantastic.

    I can't call the guy lazy because he's obviously a smart guy and good enough to get in the door to begin with at 6 figures.

  5. #5
    That's fucking awesome.

  6. #6
    Watch for ethics rules at jobs to include language to make this a firing offense in the next few months.

  7. #7
    Banned
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    Efficient indeed, he maximized his reward for effort expended, and his employers got more out of it than the US Gov.Does for paying people to surf the bureaucracy for benefits. His employers did get the work they were paying for, they just overpaid – to a middleman. I don’t approve, certainly, but I am not even sure if he committed a violation of anything but ethics. Nowadays that hardly seems to count for much.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Double R View Post
    Not bad for a bot
    I legit thought it was real and wondered why he was banned
    aka B18C5er

  10. #10
    He posted a spam link for some loan bs. Executed on the spot

  11. #11
    That bot is a lounge mod on ***

  12. #12

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