Join Today
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    The Pervinator MyNamesNotSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK/Victoria, B.C
    Posts
    77

    You sneaky bastards




    Thought we wouldn't notice eh? we're on to you...

  2. #2

  3. #3
    The Pervinator MyNamesNotSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK/Victoria, B.C
    Posts
    77
    Got it with my change, had to ask the cashier if it was real.

  4. #4

  5. #5
    GunSlingerTequilaDrinker
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    981
    i have a crap ton of them, its not as popular as strippers want money that folds, not jingle

  6. #6
    Dude, the coins here are getting lighter and lighter. Newer dimes feel like they're made of plastic.

    That coin you posted probably has chocolate inside if you unwrap it. Worthless shit currency.
    aka - Annihilia

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Das Kapitalist View Post
    Dude, the coins here are getting lighter and lighter. Newer dimes feel like they're made of plastic.

    That coin you posted probably has chocolate inside if you unwrap it. Worthless shit currency.
    “The value of the metal in a nickel is worth six point eight cents,” he said. “Did you know that?”

    I didn’t.

    “I just bought a million dollars’ worth of them,” he said, and then, perhaps sensing I couldn’t do the math: “twenty million nickels.”

    “You bought twenty million nickels?

    “Uh-huh."

    “How do you buy twenty million nickels?”

    “Actually, it’s very difficult,” he said, and then explained that he had to call his bank and talk them into ordering him twenty million nickels. The bank had finally done it, but the Federal Reserve had its own questions. “The Fed apparently called my guy at the bank,” he says. “They asked him, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ So he called me and asked, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ And I said, ‘I just like nickels.’”

    He pulled out a photograph of his nickels and handed it to me. There they were, piled up on giant wooden pallets in a Brink’s vault in downtown Dallas.

    “I’m telling you, in the next two years they’ll change the content of the nickel,” he said. “You really ought to call your bank and buy some now.”

    -Kyle Bass

  8. #8
    The Pervinator MyNamesNotSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK/Victoria, B.C
    Posts
    77
    @ Punisher: What you do is bounce them into their snatch, if you get 5 in you get a poster.


    How long have they been in circulation for?

  9. #9
    GunSlingerTequilaDrinker
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    981
    the sakajew has been since 2000, the most recent mint is the one with andrew johnson on it 2007-now

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake View Post
    “The value of the metal in a nickel is worth six point eight cents,” he said. “Did you know that?”

    I didn’t.

    “I just bought a million dollars’ worth of them,” he said, and then, perhaps sensing I couldn’t do the math: “twenty million nickels.”

    “You bought twenty million nickels?

    “Uh-huh."

    “How do you buy twenty million nickels?”

    “Actually, it’s very difficult,” he said, and then explained that he had to call his bank and talk them into ordering him twenty million nickels. The bank had finally done it, but the Federal Reserve had its own questions. “The Fed apparently called my guy at the bank,” he says. “They asked him, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ So he called me and asked, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ And I said, ‘I just like nickels.’”

    He pulled out a photograph of his nickels and handed it to me. There they were, piled up on giant wooden pallets in a Brink’s vault in downtown Dallas.

    “I’m telling you, in the next two years they’ll change the content of the nickel,” he said. “You really ought to call your bank and buy some now.”

    -Kyle Bass

    thats awesome

  11. #11
    The Pervinator MyNamesNotSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK/Victoria, B.C
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Punisher11 View Post
    the sakajew has been since 2000, the most recent mint is the one with andrew johnson on it 2007-now
    Ahh I see, I thought the $1 bill was going to be replaced by the coin
    RustRocket

  12. #12
    27 Time World Champions themaskedriger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    64
    We've always had $1 coins, but they're never going to replace the $1 bill.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake View Post
    “The value of the metal in a nickel is worth six point eight cents,” he said. “Did you know that?”

    I didn’t.

    “I just bought a million dollars’ worth of them,” he said, and then, perhaps sensing I couldn’t do the math: “twenty million nickels.”

    “You bought twenty million nickels?

    “Uh-huh."

    “How do you buy twenty million nickels?”

    “Actually, it’s very difficult,” he said, and then explained that he had to call his bank and talk them into ordering him twenty million nickels. The bank had finally done it, but the Federal Reserve had its own questions. “The Fed apparently called my guy at the bank,” he says. “They asked him, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ So he called me and asked, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ And I said, ‘I just like nickels.’”

    He pulled out a photograph of his nickels and handed it to me. There they were, piled up on giant wooden pallets in a Brink’s vault in downtown Dallas.

    “I’m telling you, in the next two years they’ll change the content of the nickel,” he said. “You really ought to call your bank and buy some now.”

    -Kyle Bass
    aka - Annihilia

  14. #14
    Here's where I pulled it from. There's more in the book Boomerang by Michael Lewis. Kyle Bass ftw

    A guy sitting in an office in Dallas, Texas, making sweeping claims about the future of countries he’d hardly set foot in: how on earth could he know how a bunch of people he’d never met might behave? As he laid out his ideas I had an experience I’ve often had, while listening to people who seem perfectly certain about uncertain events. One part of me was swept away by his argument and began to worry the world was about to collapse; the other part suspected he might be nuts. “That’s great,” I said, but I was already thinking about the flight I needed to catch. “But even if you’re right, what can any normal person do about it?”



    He stared at me as if he’d just seen an interesting sight: the world’s stupidest man.



    “What do you tell your mother when she asks you where to put her money?” I asked.



    “Guns and gold,” he said simply.



    “Guns and gold,” I said. So he was nuts.



    But not gold futures,” he said, paying no attention to my thoughts.



    "You need physical gold.” He explained that when the next crisis struck, the gold futures market was likely to seize up, as there were more outstanding futures contracts than available gold. People who thought they owned gold would find they owned pieces of paper instead. He opened his desk drawer, hauled out a giant gold brick, and dropped it on the desk. “We’ve bought a lot of this stuff.” At this point, I was giggling nervously and glancing toward the door.

    So many others were giggling along. They were giggling all the way as gold rose from $800 to $1900. Probably not giggling now...

    On nickels:

    He still owned stacks of gold and platinum bars that had roughly doubled in value, but he remained on the lookout for hard stores of wealth as a hedge against what he assumed was the coming debasement of fiat currency. Nickels, for instance.



    “The value of the metal in a nickel is worth six point eight cents,” he said. “Did you know that?”



    I didn’t.



    “I just bought a million dollars’ worth of them,” he said, and then, perhaps sensing I couldn’t do the math: “twenty million nickels.”



    “You bought twenty million nickels?”



    “Uh-huh.”



    “How do you buy twenty million nickels?”



    “Actually, it’s very difficult,” he said, and then explained that he had to call his bank and talk them into ordering him twenty million nickels. The bank had finally done it, but the Federal Reserve had its own questions. “The Fed apparently called my guy at the bank,” he says. “They asked him, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ So he called me and asked, ‘Why do you want all these nickels?’ And I said, ‘I just like nickels.’”



    He pulled out a photograph of his nickels and handed it to me. There they were, piled up on giant wooden pallets in a Brink’s vault in downtown Dallas.



    “I’m telling you, in the next two years they’ll change the content of the nickel,” he said. “You really ought to call your bank and buy some now.”

    And on how to prepare for what is coming and why it is coming:

    We hopped into his Hummer, decorated with bumper stickers (God Bless Our Troops, Especially Our Snipers) and customized to maximize the amount of fun its owner could have in it: for instance, he could press a button and, James Bond–like, coat the road behind him in giant tacks. We roared out into the Texas hill country, where, with the fortune he’d made off the subprime crisis, Kyle Bass had purchased what amounted to a fort: a forty-thousand-square-foot ranch house on thousands of acres in the middle of nowhere, with its own water supply, and an arsenal of automatic weapons and sniper rifles and small explosives to equip a battalion. That night we tore around his property in the back of his U.S. Army jeep, firing the very latest-issue U.S. Army sniper rifles, equipped with infrared scopes, at the beavers that he felt were a menace to his waterways. “There are these explosives you can buy on the Internet,” he said, as we bounded over the yellow hills. “It’s a molecular reaction. FedEx will deliver hundreds of pounds of these things.” The few beavers that survived the initial night rifle assault would wake up to watch their dams being more or less vaporized.



    “It doesn’t exactly sound like a fair fight,” I said.



    “Beavers are rodents,” he said.



    Whatever else he was doing, he was clearly having fun. He’d spent two and a half years watching the global financial system, and the people who ran it, confirm his dark view of them. It didn’t get him down. It thrilled him to have gotten his mind around seemingly incomprehensible events. “I’m not someone who is hell-bent on being negative his whole life,” he said. “I think this is something we need to go through. It’s atonement. It’s atonement for the sins of the past.”

  15. #15
    Hm, maybe I'll pick it up. Sounds interesting.
    aka - Annihilia

  16. #16
    I think most of the book is comprised of vanity fair articles. I read people bitching that the entire book can be found for free. E-book wasn't too expensive but I'm sure you can find most of it online if you search.

  17. #17
    Oh word, thanks for the heads up. Still seems like a fun read.
    aka - Annihilia

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •